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 By PA Sport

FA chief Glenn says many will wonder how we lived without VAR

The Football Association is confident the Video Assistant Referee system will soon become a permanent fixture in English football following its competitive debut.

VAR, which enables referees to consult technology over major decisions, was made available for the first time in Brighton's FA Cup victory over Crystal Palace on Monday evening.

Although the system -- which has been in use in Italy's Serie A and the Bundesliga in Germany this season -- was not used during the third-round clash, FA chief executive Martin Glenn hailed its introduction.

"We were a big supporter of VAR being embraced in football after years of it being challenged by Sepp Blatter and FIFA,'' Glenn said. "The FA generally thinks that in a few years' time we will wonder how we ever lived without it.

"I was pleased as it seemed to work the right way. The good news is that the game didn't stop once and there appeared to be good teamwork between [referee] Andre Marriner and [VAR] Neil Swarbrick.

"It's the result of a lot of testing having been done already in a non-game situation, which has really refined this referee to technology interface. The big question now is: should we put it into the World Cup?''

FIFA president Gianni Infantino is keen for VAR to be used at this summer's tournament in Russia. The International Football Association Board (IFAB) will make a final ruling when it gathers for its annual general meeting in March.

Glenn, meanwhile, also moved to reiterate the FA's stance on the need for a winter break following a number of complaints about the congested fixture list.

Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola claimed the hectic festive schedule is likely to inflict serious damage on the players involved.

"It is not the FA's job to tell the leagues how many games they should play,'' Glenn said. "That is a job for the Premier League and the EFL, but clearly it is in football's interest if some sort of winter break could be created.

"The winter break however, has been talked about for more than 30 years and it means different people in the game changing the way they work. The fact that it hasn't' happened tells you that it is difficult.''

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